Marijuana for Medical Use in Colorado

Fourteen states currently allow marijuana for medical use, and Colorado is one of these states. The law went into effect in Colorado in 2001. In order to legally use marijuana in this state, a person must have documentation from a physician that he or she suffers from a serious medical condition and that marijuana may help this condition. The patient or their primary caregiver is then allowed to possess two ounces or less of marijuana for medical use. According to the law, they also have the right to grow six or less marijuana plants with only three of these being mature enough to be used to smoke.

Ever since marijuana for medical use has been legalized in Colorado, advocates of marijuana usage have tried to locate physicians who will recommend this drug. marihuana kaufen online The problem of physicians making casual recommendations became so widespread that a new law requiring doctors to perform a physical exam became effective on June 7, 2010 when Colorado Governor Bill Ritter signed the bills into law. House Bill 1284 regulates how marijuana can be sold. Physicians must not only provide physical exams before recommending marijuana, but in addition, their medical license cannot be flagged and they cannot own or profit from the establishment that dispenses the marijuana.

The original law legalizing marijuana for medical use approved usage for those patients with severe pain, cancer, severe nausea, HIV/AIDS positive, glaucoma, seizures, and muscle spasms, including multiple sclerosis. Patients may use it for other conditions, but only if approved by the Colorado Board of Health.

Those who believe that marijuana should be legal for all citizens have many websites online, offering names of physicians they recommend, even though they claim that these doctors will not necessarily distribute prescriptions for the drug. Other sites online discuss how it can help many other conditions, even ADHD in children.

Even those who have documentation from their physicians are not allowed to use marijuana wherever and whenever they want to use it. For instance, the Colorado law – Amendment 20 – says that physicians may recommend marijuana. Doctors may not prescribe it since it is still illegal according to federal law. The state amendment allows individuals to grow their own plants for medical use. There are also regulations stipulating where a patient may smoke, which is in private, and not in public areas where they can be seen by others.